Breaking Down the Stats

70% of people make purchasing decisions to solve problems. 30% make decisions to gain something.

What kind of problems? You name it … they’re out there. Granted, some of them are perceived problems. But perception is reality until something happens to change it.

As for the 30% who want to gain something – well, that usually means that they want to feel better in some way, right? Isn’t that why we buy things like vitamins, whole foods, energy drinks, skin care, etc.?

I had a brilliant mentor, (love you, Bob!) who once told me that everyone walks around with an invisible sign that says “just love me.” It doesn’t matter how together we look on the outside, we all have pain. People will move toward pleasure, but more so away from pain. And they’re looking for someone to help them take it away.

Your job is to find out what’s causing pain for your prospect and what, if anything, your product or service can do to help stop it. The only way to do that is to ask questions that get to the heart of the matter. Finding out the answers will help you both decide the next step in the process.

Hint: You might want to say something like this … “Do you mind if I ask you a few quick questions in order to determine if what you’re looking for and what we have to offer is a good fit?” (This is permission marketing because no one likes to feel as if they’re being interrogated). Ha!

Note: 80% of sales don’t take place until after the fifth phone call, so if you think that making one sales call will do the trick, keep in mind … ” the end is not the end.”

Did I get all this right the first time? Noooooo. But once I learned that it wasn’t about me making a sale; that it was about them, things got a whole lot easier.

OK, boys and girls. Sales training 101 is now over. Hope that helps.

01.06.17difference

 

 

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Author: Regina

Passionate about writing, photography, and helping others achieve the success they desire.

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