Cactus Ranch

My throw-back Thursday image is one that I really love. It makes me a little homesick for the desert and the Catalina Mountains I saw every day. I think I took them for granted. Sorry!

When I first got my Nikon camera, I played a lot with settings and this image is one that came out pretty good, I think. The sun was starting to set on the mountains and peering through the storm clouds that were gathering for a summer rain that evening.

We called this place the cactus ranch because it was eight acres of cactus; all shapes, sizes and varieties. But even cactus has it’s own beauty.

Be good to yourself and each other. Namaste’

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Cactus and Caddies

Going through my photo archives today, I found images of two of our “past life” cars. Both of our Cadillacs were purchased from a friend of my Mom’s who took excellent care of them.

I have a penchant for giving our cars names. The Coupe De Ville was GRACE. And the El Dorado was LADY PEARL. Such great memories of my life in Tucson. My Mom and the lady who sold us these cars are both gone now along with the Caddies. But life moves on and so do we.

We estimated that Saguaro to be approximately 500 years old because each arm takes 40-50 years to grow. Amazing! We dubbed it Woody’s Hotel because of the woodpeckers who raised their babies in the holes.

Be good to yourself and each other. Namaste’

I Didn’t Really Want to See That

While at the Reid Park Zoo in Tucson, I was trying to catch a good shot of the flamingos but ….

No, I don’t need a model release for this shot … hahaha! Namaste’

02.06.15PelicansRegina (Reggie) Arnold is a “flunked retirement” entrepreneur, co-author of The Art & Science of Recruiting, an award-winning photographic artist, and photo blogger.

Night Bloomer

The southern Arizona desert has some interesting plants and flowers.  Recently I was combing through some of my images and found these.  The top one is an image of a night-blooming Peruvian Cereus, which was in our back yard at the “Cactus Ranch.”  Unfortunately, the hard freeze that we had a few years ago destroyed the plant.  I found that to be particularly sad, but everything has a life cycle, including us.

The good news is that we can leave behind something of beauty if we choose.  We all have that opportunity.  I’m grateful to our Cereus plant for sharing her beauty with us, and that I was able to capture these images for posterity.  I did some digital enhancements on the top one because I’ll be using it for cards.  The bottom image is what the plant looks like with several blooms.  Namaste’

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Regina (Gina) Arnold is the author of Uncomplicated Ways to Find Your Financial Freedom, a “flunked retirement” entrepreneur, co-author of The Art & Science of Recruiting, an award-winning photographic artist,  and photo blogger.

Coolness on a Hot Day

Well, my friends, it’s going to be a hot time in the Old Pueblo today … weather-wise.  Supposed to be 103 today and 104 tomorrow.  Lucky us!  Ha!

So I thought I’d post this image of flamingos that I took at the zoo earlier this year (and never had time to post).  Makes me feel cooler just looking at them.

I’m jealous that they have their feet in the water 🙂  Namaste’

Flamingos.signed

In Like a Lamb

Here in sunny southern AZ, I’m finding that Spring is edging ever closer.  New plants are starting to come up all around me and I love it.  I just wish I could send it to the other parts of the country that are still knee deep in that cold, white, frozen precipitation.  They’re getting all of that, and we’re praying that the prediction of rain for us tomorrow will actually come to pass.  Go figure.

Mother Nature can be tricky sometimes but she always escorts Spring in like a lamb.  It just takes longer to get to some places.

I did manage to see this crop of yellow wildflowers and since they were on the ridge behind our house, I had to stand on my tiptoes and zoom way out to get this image.

So this is for all of my friends who are still frigid.  Don’t take that the wrong way 🙂  Namaste’

wildflowers